THE CENTRE FOR HISTORY AND ECONOMICS
WHAT IS NEW IN SOCIAL HISTORY?
 Lunchroom in Chicago, 1896. Getty.

Programme

 

Nihon Room, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge
28-29 September 2023

 

Thursday, September 28
9:00am: Welcome/Coffee
9:30 am: Introduction

 

10:00 am - 12:00pm. Panel I. Interdisciplinarity in Action

Simona Cerutti (EHESS): Social History and the Law: The Conditions for a Fruitful Encounter (Savoy Estate, 18th century)

Quentin Deluermoz (Université de Paris): Interactions, Process, Configurations: The Commune de Paris as a Test

Corentin Durand (Sciences Po Paris) and Elsa Génard (Harvard University): A Peculiar Relationship From One Century to the Next. Petitions to the Warden as Acts of Citizenship (France, 1910s-1930s/2010s)

 

12pm - 1:30pm. Lunch

 

1:30 - 3:30pm: Panel II. The Transformation of Social History since the 1970s

Joanna Innes (University of Oxford): History and the Social Sciences in Britain, An Emeritus Perspective

Emma Rothschild (Harvard University): Social History Revisited (c. 1979): Histories of Economic Life in the French Provinces

Sarah Knott (Indiana University) and Alex Shepard (University of Glasgow): The Care Cycle: A Labour History of Life

 

3:30 - 4:00 pm: Coffee break

 

4:00 - 6:00 pm: Panel III. Working with and on Silences

Martin Dusinberre (University of Zurich): Seeing and Hearing the Social in Transpacific Japan

Anton Perdoncin (CNRS) and Claire Zalc (CNRS-EHESS): Identification, Relations, Trajectories: How to Interpret Silence in Historical Materials? The Case of a Polish Population Register, Lubartów 1930s and 1940s

Mezna Qato (Newnham College, University of Cambridge): Impossible Retrievals: A Palestinian Childhood After Catastrophe

 

7:30 pm: Dinner at a local restaurant

 

Friday, September 29

9:30 : Welcome/Coffee

 

9:45 - 11:45am: Panel IV. Beyond Constructivism

Mallory Hope (Harvard University): Taking Political Risks:Financial Speculation and Innovation in Marseille’s Marine Insurance Market, 1754-1783

Claire Lemercier (CNRS) (with Clare Crowston): From Numbers to Boundaries, from Boundaries to Numbers: Apprentices in Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century France

Madeline Woker (University of Cambridge): Racial Capitalism and the Social History of Colonialism

 

12:00  – 1:30 pm: Lunch

 

1:30 – 3:30 pm: Panel V. Styles of Inquiry, Writing Styles

Renaud Morieux (University of Cambridge): The Past Lasts Forever: An Early-Modern Social Historian Confronted by his Family History

Roseanna Webster (University of Cambridge): An Olivarera [Olive Worker] from Andalusia and New Ways to Write History

Stéphane Gerson (NYU): Historians and Their Kin: Recoveries, Excavations, Recastings

 

3:30 – 4:15 pm. Closing discussion 

  

 

 

 

(c) 2023 Centre for History and Economics